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Events Slated to Help Residents Tackle Rebuilding Challenges – Open to Everyone

Events Slated to Help Residents Tackle Rebuilding Challenges – Open to Everyone

The next few weeks offer several opportunities for fire survivors to get expert advice and information regarding the complex challenges in rebuilding, financing and insurance.  To find these events and more, check the events page on the Coffey Strong website, make sure you are registered with Coffey Strong and receive our regular emails, and follow us on Facebook too.

United Policyholders Roadmap to Recovery Workshop

Tuesday evening April 24th, 2018 at the Unitarian Universalist Church at 547 Mendocino Ave. in downtown Santa Rosa

Topics:

  • Negotiating successfully with your insurer
  • Resolving claim disputes informally and formally
  • Waivers, deadline extensions
  • UP Survey results summary
  • Permits and building code requirements
  • Debris removal reimbursement

Speakers:

Sandra Watts, an insurance professional with 20 years of claim adjusting experience (with State Farm)

Amy Bach, policyholder advocate

Nathan Quarles, County Rebuilding/Permit Sonoma

Steve Jensen, Santa Rosa Resilient City Permit Center

Michael Gossman, County of Sonoma, Government-sponsored debris removal program insurance reimbursement information

Coffey Strong – Construction, Rebuild Strategy and Finance Seminar
(free open to all Northbay Fire Survivors, not just Coffey Park residents-please register on Eventbrite)

April 26, 2018 from 6:00 – 8:00 PM, Bayside Church (formerly known as Redwood Covenant Church) ~ 3175 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa

Coffey Strong is hosting an event that is open to all Northbay Fire Survivors. This event is to help address and provide solutions to the most current and pressing issues fire survivors face. Please help share the event info below.

Topics:

  • Overview of the rebuilding process

  • Strategies from two prior fire survivors to get control of your funds from your insurance company

  • Strategies to maximize your rebuild funds

  • Processing escrow draws and pre-liens to protect from paying twice

  • Construction Contract protection

  • Construction Lending

Speakers:

  • Matthew Grill – Coffey Strong Volunteer, Prior Fire Survivor with building and development background

  • Kunal Nagpal – Prior Fire Survivor, Current Builder, and Lender

  • Kevin Smart – Exchange Bank Residential Lending Vice President

 

Coffey Strong meeting with CA Senator Mike McGuire.

May 4, 6:00 PM, Bayside Church (formerly known as Redwood Covenant Church) ~ 3175 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa

Free 1:1 Financial Planning for Fire Survivors

The Financial Planning Assn of SF and it’s Certified Financial Planner® volunteers would like to offer FREE, no-strings attached financial planning advice to the Coffey Park Neighborhood. We know how important a good financial sounding board can be as you make financial decisions around the impact of the recent wildfires. CFP volunteers are offering one-on-one financial counseling sessions on Saturday, 3/17, from 12pm to 4pm. No business cards will be handed out. Your name will not be used for any type of marketing or sales activity. We want you to know that we are offering a safe place to get financial advice. Appointments are one hour in length. 
Click link for scheduling:https://calendly.com/fpd/santa-rosa
Saturday, April 28th, 11am-3pmSonoma Rebound, 353 College Ave
Monday, May 1st, 6-8pm, Ameriprise office, 611 Humboldt St.
Saturday, May 5th, 11am-3pm, Sonoma Rebound, 353 College Ave
Saturday, May 12th10am-2pmAmeriprise office, 611 Humboldt St.
Tuesday, May 15th, 6-8pmRidgeview Financial, 1955 Cleveland Ave, Suite 203
Saturday, May 19th, 11am-3pmSonoma Rebound, 353 College Ave
Saturday, May 26th, 11am-3pm, Ameriprise office, 611 Humboldt St
Saturday, June 2nd, 11am-3pm, Sonoma Rebound, 353 College Ave
Saturday, June 9th, 10am-2pmAmeriprise office, 611 Humboldt St

 

12 tips for a healthy building contract

12 Tips for a Healthy Building Contract

12 Tips for a Healthy Building Contract

2-15-18 by Matthew Grill, with from Lihn Pham and Jeff Okrepkie

12 Tips for a Healthy Building Contract

Contracts are an essential part of the construction industry. A contract between a property owner and a building contractor, setting forth the terms under which construction is to be carried out, the basis of remuneration, the time scale, and the penalties, if any, (for failure to comply with terms of the contract) is termed as a building/construction contract.  Before you sign this kind of a agreement, it is important to understand the terminology and scope of this agreement you are establishing.

Recommended Basic Contract: AIA A101 

The AIA (American Institute of Architects) A101 agreement is a standardized contract that is used by owners and contractors.  It is fair and balanced.  Any changes that are made to the standard document are noted or stricken so all parties can see the modifications.  Using this agreement will lessen the need for an attorney to review, or limit the attorney review time.  Most general contractors should be very familiar with this contract, and they should have no problem using it.  This will allow the owner to be in control of the contract versus the general contractor supplying it.  This is not to say the owner cannot use the general contractor’s contract.  Just remember that the contractor wrote it. 

Contract Basics 

Everything that is in the plans needs to be explicitly included or not included in the contract.  Make sure the general contractor is covering the entire plan for the home, then clearly listing out the exclusions and the allowances.  There should be nothing left up in the air.  Here is an example. 

contract language example 1
contract language example 1

Tip 1: Check for what is left off the contract

Carefully verify what is being excluded to make sure there are no gaps in what the general contractor is covering.  It is possible that you would need to budget for additional items that don’t appear on the agreement. Also, if getting multiple bids, verify that the exclusions match for all the general contractors you are considering.  The difference in exclusions could account for why one general contractor’s bid is lower than the other. 

Tip 2: Beware the potential added cost of allowances

Allowances, or owner options, are variable costs that can add up.  Pricing should be largely defined in the bid and contract.  It is fine to have a couple of small allowances that make sense.  Too many allowances is a red flag and could provide a contractor the ability to increase the contract amount well over the base contract.  If there are owner upgrades that were not identified at the time of contract signing, but options the owner elected to add to the contract work, a separate Change Order should be prepared outlining the additional work, and the document should be signed by both the owner and the builder.   

Tip 3: Architect’s responsibility 

The architect should put all of the specifications for the home on the plans.  This includes cabinet quality and style, countertop type, appliance brands/type, lighting and plumbing fixture specifications, flooring type/selections, and etc.  Specifications will allow contractors to make their bid based on accurate pricing, and will ensure that the homeowner is covered so that change orders do not occur because of missing information.   

Tip 4: Change orders add up

Change orders can be a costly addition to a project especially when a contractor comes in with a low bid.   Change orders are an area where contractors can make up a lot of ground on a low bid.  It will be tough not to have an occasion change order, but the key is to limit the exposure and put the contractor on notice that change orders will be scrutinized. 

Change Order Example
Change Order Clause Example

 

Tip 5: Insurance matters

The general contractor and all subcontractors need to name the homeowner additionally insured, and it should be spelled out in the agreement. 

Liability insurance: Minimum: $1,000,000 single claim, with $2,000,000 aggregate limits. Be sure to verify if this is a per location limit or total for the entirety of the project. Builders can group individual home rebuilds together as a single “project”. If there IS NOT a per location limit, then losses at other addresses can diminish the limits of coverage and impact you in the case of a claim.  

Workman’s compensation:  Minimum: $1,000,000

Employee automobile coverage: Minimum: $1,000,000

Additional insurance types: 

Builders Risk: (this can be provided by the owner or the contractor). Builders risk covers all property during the rebuild. This includes raw materials like stacked dry wall but also the house during construction, as it isn’t a completed building. Some homeowner’s insurance companies will cover the builders risk exposure during the rebuild. Verify who will be providing this insurance with your builder and insurance company.  

Professional Liability: Verify that all architects and engineers have professional liability or “errors & omissions” insurance. Most general liability policies do not cover professional services.  

Tip 6: Construction schedule  

There needs to be a defined construction schedule in the agreement.  The homeowner should be able to track where the home will be by certain dates and when they can expect completion.  A construction schedule cannot be prepared until building plans have been approved but the City, so make sure you clarify with the builder when you should expect a construction schedule following plan approval.  

Tip 7: Construction Delays 

There needs to be some language that protects the homeowner in the event there is a delay that is inside of the contractor’s control where they can terminate the agreement.  Especially, with the projected labor shortages and other factors.  An example could be if the project sits for 30 days with no progress or if the job is more than 60 to 90 days behind schedule, the owner has the right to cancel the agreement.  

Tip 8: Draw Schedule 

There needs to be a clear understanding in the agreement of how and when the contractors will get paid.  If there is a mortgage company holding the insurance funds, there is a timeline that needs to be defined so that the contractor’s payment draw schedule can be reconciled with release of insurance proceeds.  The last thing anyone wants is a misunderstanding of funding.  The contractor and subcontractors could pull off the job if they do not get progress payments in a timely manner.   

Tip 9: Funding details are so important  

Unlike a new construction loan, where the funding is dictated by a construction draw schedule provided by the contractor, in a fire-rebuild, the money to pay the contractor comes from the mortgage company.  Customarily, the mortgage company will issue the insurance proceeds in thirds:

  1. The initial one-third of the insurance proceeds is released upon receipt of the above-listed documents and the payment check(s).  It is not uncommon to have to wait 3-4 weeks for that first payment to arrive.
  2. The second installment payment from the mortgage company is issued at 50% completion of the construction,
  3. The final one-third draw is issued at substantial completion (95% or better) of the project.

The mortgage company will need to be notified by the owner when the project is 50% complete, and when substantial completion phases approach since they will send inspectors to verify the construction progress before they will issue payments.  Some mortgage companies may be willing to issue draws in different increments, but that is something to address once you know what your contractor’s requirements are for their payment draws.  At any rate, the communication between you and your Contractors is pivotal and it will help the entire process along, and keep cash flowing for the contractors. 

Tip 10: Insurance deprecation hold-back 

The insurance company is likely to hold back 20-25% of the initial payout. Once the project is completed they will release the depreciated funds that are held back.  Check with your adjuster to see if they can promptly release those funds and how many days/weeks until they expect you to receive supplemental payments.  If there is a mortgage company, the insurance supplemental check(s) will be made out to the homeowner and the mortgage company.  This customarily adds 3-4 weeks from the time of your receipt of the insurance payments to the time those funds are processed and issued by the mortgage companies.  Make sure to request overnight delivery of all payments from the mortgage company, and all of the  check(s) that you send to them are overnighted as well.  This could save weeks between deliveries. 

Tip 11: Documents needed for draw release 

The contractor must submit the following for progress payments.  These documents are for mortgage company disbursements and protection of the homeowner.  The mortgage company may require less documentation, but the homeowner must get the following to protect themselves. 

  • An invoice for the percentage of work completed in accordance with draw schedule outlined in the contract. 
  • A conditional lien release on progress payment from their company and all subcontractors and material suppliers.   
  • Proof that the general contractor has verified that the subtractors have paid their employees in accordance with the new state law that went into effect January 1, 2018. 

Once paid, the contractor, subcontractors and material suppliers must provide an unconditional lien release on progress payment.  Future draws will not be issued until all unconditional lien releases for prior payments are given to the owner. 

To release final payment: 

  • An invoice for final payment in accordance with the draw schedule outlined in the contract. 
  • The contractor must have all City sign-offs for the owner to occupy the home. 
  • A conditional lien release on final payment from their company and all subcontractors and material suppliers.   
  • Proof that the general contractor has verified that the subtractors have paid their employees in accordance with the new state law that went into effect January 1, 2018. 
  • Notice of completion must be filed within 10 days of final payment. 

Once paid by the owner, the contractor, subcontractors and material suppliers must provide an unconditional lien release on final payment.   

Tip 12: Dispute resolution  

In the event, there is a dispute between the owner and the contractor, it is best to have language that spells out dispute resolution.  Always consult with a lawyer for the best language and advice.  The example below allows for steps that will not end up in a court, but will be decided by binding arbitration which is much quicker and less expensive. 

Dispute resolution sample language
Dispute resolution sample language

 

 

Mortgage payments in thirds

The Mortgage Payment Process

The Mortgage Payment Process

by guest author Linh Pham, construction consultant

Mortgage Company Controls Insurance Funds

Once you have an agreed scope and cost of repairs and your insurance company has issued payment, for those Homeowners who have a Mortgage Loan on their home, the insurance payment will include the Mortgage company (or Companies if you have multiple lenders on the home), on the payment check(s). By law, Mortgage companies are required to be named on the insurance payment(s), as they have a vested interest in the property, namely the balance of your loan. They want to protect that interest by controlling the funds, and making sure that the money is applied to the Dwelling restoration so that their assets are protected.

You will have to contact your Mortgage company to request their proprietary forms as those forms will need to be completed by you and your Contractor. Ask the Mortgage company to send you their Loss Draft package (documents & forms) by e-mail so you can save time by not waiting for the package to arrive by US (Snail) mail. You will be instructed to endorse the payment check(s), and send it to the Mortgage company along with the estimate of repairs on which the settlement is based, the claim payment summary from your carrier, your signed Contract with the Contractor, and all the proprietary forms that they require you and your Contractor to complete. Only after they receive the above listed documents and the insurance payment check (s) will they begin their document review and funding process.

Funding for Your Construction Project

Unlike a new construction loan, where the funding is dictated by a construction draw schedule provided by your Contractor, in a fire-rebuild, the money to pay the Contractor comes from the Mortgage company. Customarily, the Mortgage company will issue the insurance proceeds in thirds.

The initial one-third of the insurance proceeds is released upon receipt of the above listed documents and the payment check(s). It is not uncommon to have to wait 3-4 weeks for that first payment to arrive. The second installment payment from the Mortgage company is issued at 50% completion of the construction, and the final one-third draw is issued at substantial completion (95% or better) of the project.

The Mortgage company will need to be notified by the Owner as the 50% and substantial completion phases approach, since they will send inspectors to verify the construction progress before they will issue payments.

Educate Your Contractor on the Payment Process

be diligent and forthright in discussing the funding process with your contractorMake sure that the Contractor with which you are working understands this process, and that they are willing to work directly with you and the Mortgage company so that these funds are released in a timely manner.

Before you sign on with a Contractor, do your best to address the funding issue with your Contractor and verify that he has enough capital to fund the project through the completion. Consider the volume of work being performed by the Contractor because if the Contractor is building 10-50 houses simultaneously, the Contractor may have cash flow issues as these projects near completion.

Be careful in vetting your Contractor to make sure that he actually has enough capital to undertake what he’s promising to do. Ask the Contractor if they have enough capital in reserves and backing or credit lines necessary to float the project through to completion, given the Mortgage companies’ payment practice.

Be diligent and forthright in discussing the funding process with your Contractor, as the way in which the Mortgage companies issue draws may not be familiar to your Contractor, especially if they have no experience with insurance restoration/repairs. Review with your Contractor the mortgage payment process as all parties have to enter into the construction agreement with eyes wide open.

If you are unclear in how the process works, and are uncomfortable explaining the process to your Contractor, you could refer them to a consultant (like Scope Writing Services) as they can also be used to help educate your Contractor on the Mortgage process. You don’t have to go through this process alone.

sba loan deadline dec 11

December 11th Deadline to Register for Disaster Assistance/Low-Interest Loans

December 11th Deadline to Register for Disaster Assistance/Low-Interest Loans

Small Business Administration (SBA) Disaster Loans are the primary source of federal long-term disaster recovery funds for disaster damage not fully covered by insurance or other compensation. SBA’s Office of Disaster Assistance is working in conjunction with the Governor’s Office of Emergency Services (Cal OES) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency to help business owners and residents recover as much as possible from this disaster.

To qualify for SBA you must have already applied to FEMA.

The SBA is providing one-on-one assistance to help business owners and residents apply for an SBA disaster loan at the the Disaster Recovery Center. No appointment is necessary.

Santa Rosa Disaster Recovery Center
Press Democrat building, 427 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa, CA 95401 (between Ross and 5th Streets)

Open every day, from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Types of Loans

Businesses

Businesses of all sizes and private nonprofit organizations may borrow up to $2 million to repair or replace damaged or destroyed real estate, machinery and equipment, inventory, and other business assets. SBA can also lend additional funds to help business and residents with the cost of making improvements that protect, prevent or minimize the same type of disaster damage from occurring in the future.

Small Businesses and Nonprofit Organizations

For small businesses and most private nonprofit organizations of all sizes, SBA offers Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDL) to help meet working capital needs caused by the disaster. EIDL assistance is available regardless of whether the business suffered any property damage.

Homeowners

Disaster loans up to $200,000 are available to homeowners to repair or replace their damaged or destroyed primary residence. Homeowners and renters are eligible for up to $40,000 to repair or replace damaged or destroyed personal property.

How to Apply:

Go to the SBA Disaster Loan Assistance website to:

  • View Eligible Disaster Areas
  • Apply Online
  • Check Application Status

Applicants may apply online using the Electronic Loan Application (ELA) via SBA’s secure website at https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela.

Disaster loan information and application forms are also available from SBA’s Customer Service Center by calling (800) 659-2955 or emailing [email protected]. Individuals who are deaf or hardofhearing may call (800) 877-8339. For more disaster assistance information, or to download applications, visit http://www.sba.gov/disaster. Completed applications should be mailed to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925 Kingsport Road, Fort Worth, TX 76155.

Application Filing Deadlines

Physical Damage: December 11, 2017

Economic Injury: July 12, 2018

Reposted from the City of Santa Rosa’s recovery website: https://www.sonomacountyrecovers.org/disaster-loans/