Unsupported Screen Size: The viewport size is too small for the theme to render properly.

Pamela Van Halsema

Hopper Wall image

Hopper Walls Project: A Collaboration between Coffey Strong, AshBritt Environmental, and Rebuild Northbay Foundation

Hopper Walls Project: A Collaboration between Coffey Strong, AshBritt Environmental, and Rebuild Northbay Foundation

Coffey Strong, AshBritt Environmental and Rebuild Northbay Foundation are pleased to announce the details have been finalized for rebuilding the common perimeter walls along Hopper Ave. Coffey Strong, AshBritt Environmental and Rebuild Northbay Foundation collaborated for the past several months to ensure all of the costs were covered, including demolition of the existing walls, debris removal, and replacement with a design and fire rated material chosen by residents. The group is thankful to Martin Hirsch of the law firm of Perry, Johnson, Anderson, Miller and Moskowitz for the significant pro bono legal assistance provided for this project.

After the devastating October 9th fires, it was discovered that the Hopper wall was owned by the homeowners that adjoined it. The cost of demolition and rebuilding was a burden that would have been placed on each individual resident. Coffey Strong was determined to find a solution that would benefit the neighbors and provide a new “Gateway to Coffey Park.” The total cost to remove, dispose and replace the existing wall is approximately $ 18,250.00 per homeowner. The financial and in-kind donation from Ashbritt with the support and partnership between Rebuild Northbay Foundation and Coffey Strong has allowed this to happen.

After interviewing numerous contractors and soliciting quotes, Coffey Strong chose Restructure Group LLC of New York, the manufacturer of the RSG-3D structural panel system as the material supplier for the project. A number of RSG-3D certified contractors have participated in the design of the wall and will be responsible for the construction over a period of 3 months. The existing 6’ precast wall will be removed and replaced with a new 8’ high strength, highly durable privacy wall.  This wall system was specifically chosen for many reasons. This panel wall system is fireproof, seismic-resistant, easily repairable and sound attenuating. The 2900 linear feet of wall will be a stucco finished wall with columns placed 20’ on center.  Coffey Strong is still seeking funding for the stone veneers on the columns. 

Jeff Okrepkie, Coffey Strong Board President stated, “We’re thrilled to have AshBritt Environmental provide the funding for our solution to a significant problem for 40 of our residents. However, it doesn’t just impact those homeowners. It will bring new life to Hopper Avenue and the gateway to Coffey Park.”

AshBritt contacted Rebuild Northbay Foundation in late February inquiring about projects that would have a meaningful impact on the community. Immediately, Rebuild Executive Director Jennifer Gray Thompson suggested the Coffey Park walls. “We are all acutely aware of the number of unmet needs combined with insurance shortfalls that prevent fire survivors from rebuilding better, safer, and faster. Rebuild is committed to assisting in finding relief for the fire affected communities through collaboration with the private, public and nonprofit sectors. The collaborative relationship between AshBritt, Coffey Strong and Rebuild Northbay is a model of multi-sector problem solving after an unprecedented disaster. Together, anything is possible.”

Notably, the original estimate of $300,000 to replace the walls fell far short of the actual cost. AshBritt understood the practical and emotional imperative of completing this project and rose to the challenge.

“AshBritt’s corporate core values include being an active partner in the long-term recovery of Santa Rosa and the entire wildfire impacted area,” said AshBritt CEO Brittany Perkins.  “This includes contributing up to $650,000 supporting locally identified community recovery initiatives throughout Northern California.  The Coffey Park project is a significant symbol of recovery and resiliency for the community. AshBritt is proud to partner with Rebuild Northbay and Coffey Strong to make this happen.”

AshBritt is contributing $450,000 for the Coffey Park wall and other yet to be specified community initiatives through the Rebuild Northbay organization.  In addition, AshBritt and its partners are contributing between $100,000 to $200,000 in-kind contributions relating to the demolition, hauling, and disposal of the existing wall. 

At the execution and approval of all required permits and homeowner agreements needed to demo the existing wall and construct the new wall, AshBritt will transmit above noted funding to a segregated and specified Rebuild Northbay funding account for this project.

Coffey Strong, AshBritt, and Rebuild Northbay are grateful for the support of the City of Santa Rosa in navigating the process, from permits to removals.

“The Hopper Wall replacement project is a great example what we can accomplish when the whole community comes together.” Henry Hansel, who serves on the Board of Directors for Rebuild Northbay Foundation as well as being a major employer in the region.

Press Release Coffey Park Walls

Hopper Wall image
view of the Hopper Wall from February 25, 2018

 

events

Events Slated to Help Residents Tackle Rebuilding Challenges – Open to Everyone

Events Slated to Help Residents Tackle Rebuilding Challenges – Open to Everyone

The next few weeks offer several opportunities for fire survivors to get expert advice and information regarding the complex challenges in rebuilding, financing and insurance.  To find these events and more, check the events page on the Coffey Strong website, make sure you are registered with Coffey Strong and receive our regular emails, and follow us on Facebook too.

United Policyholders Roadmap to Recovery Workshop

Tuesday evening April 24th, 2018 at the Unitarian Universalist Church at 547 Mendocino Ave. in downtown Santa Rosa

Topics:

  • Negotiating successfully with your insurer
  • Resolving claim disputes informally and formally
  • Waivers, deadline extensions
  • UP Survey results summary
  • Permits and building code requirements
  • Debris removal reimbursement

Speakers:

Sandra Watts, an insurance professional with 20 years of claim adjusting experience (with State Farm)

Amy Bach, policyholder advocate

Nathan Quarles, County Rebuilding/Permit Sonoma

Steve Jensen, Santa Rosa Resilient City Permit Center

Michael Gossman, County of Sonoma, Government-sponsored debris removal program insurance reimbursement information

Coffey Strong – Construction, Rebuild Strategy and Finance Seminar
(free open to all Northbay Fire Survivors, not just Coffey Park residents-please register on Eventbrite)

April 26, 2018 from 6:00 – 8:00 PM, Bayside Church (formerly known as Redwood Covenant Church) ~ 3175 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa

Coffey Strong is hosting an event that is open to all Northbay Fire Survivors. This event is to help address and provide solutions to the most current and pressing issues fire survivors face. Please help share the event info below.

Topics:

  • Overview of the rebuilding process

  • Strategies from two prior fire survivors to get control of your funds from your insurance company

  • Strategies to maximize your rebuild funds

  • Processing escrow draws and pre-liens to protect from paying twice

  • Construction Contract protection

  • Construction Lending

Speakers:

  • Matthew Grill – Coffey Strong Volunteer, Prior Fire Survivor with building and development background

  • Kunal Nagpal – Prior Fire Survivor, Current Builder, and Lender

  • Kevin Smart – Exchange Bank Residential Lending Vice President

 

Coffey Strong meeting with CA Senator Mike McGuire.

May 4, 6:00 PM, Bayside Church (formerly known as Redwood Covenant Church) ~ 3175 Sebastopol Rd, Santa Rosa

Free 1:1 Financial Planning for Fire Survivors

The Financial Planning Assn of SF and it’s Certified Financial Planner® volunteers would like to offer FREE, no-strings attached financial planning advice to the Coffey Park Neighborhood. We know how important a good financial sounding board can be as you make financial decisions around the impact of the recent wildfires. CFP volunteers are offering one-on-one financial counseling sessions on Saturday, 3/17, from 12pm to 4pm. No business cards will be handed out. Your name will not be used for any type of marketing or sales activity. We want you to know that we are offering a safe place to get financial advice. Appointments are one hour in length. 
Click link for scheduling:https://calendly.com/fpd/santa-rosa
Saturday, April 28th, 11am-3pmSonoma Rebound, 353 College Ave
Monday, May 1st, 6-8pm, Ameriprise office, 611 Humboldt St.
Saturday, May 5th, 11am-3pm, Sonoma Rebound, 353 College Ave
Saturday, May 12th10am-2pmAmeriprise office, 611 Humboldt St.
Tuesday, May 15th, 6-8pmRidgeview Financial, 1955 Cleveland Ave, Suite 203
Saturday, May 19th, 11am-3pmSonoma Rebound, 353 College Ave
Saturday, May 26th, 11am-3pm, Ameriprise office, 611 Humboldt St
Saturday, June 2nd, 11am-3pm, Sonoma Rebound, 353 College Ave
Saturday, June 9th, 10am-2pmAmeriprise office, 611 Humboldt St

 

layered map of Coffey strong

Interactive Map of the Coffey Strong Area

Interactive Map of the Coffey Strong Area

Layers of Information

We love how much information can be layered into a map!  It can help you get the ‘big picture’ on a situation.  With that in mind, some talented volunteers at Coffey Strong, with the help of a generous donation from Esri/ArcGIS the mapping software company, have created an interactive online map with several layers of information embedded.  We will update this map on an ongoing basis.  You can always find this map on the Coffey Strong map resources page too.

Link to view the map.

On the map you can find: 

Coffey Strong Areas, Coffey Strong Block Captains, Lots that have sold, Properties registered with Coffey Strong

Trying to track down an neighbor to discuss the rebuild? if they are registered with Coffey Strong, you can ask your block captain to help you connect with them.

Have ideas about other data items we might track on a map? Let us know your suggestions!

know your boundaries

Know your boundaries – a guide to land surveying after the fires from the Sonoma County Chapter of the CA Land Surveyors Association

Know your boundaries – a guide to land surveying after the fires from the Sonoma County Chapter of the CA Land Surveyors Association

posted 3-28-2018 with content developed by the Sonoma County Chapter of the CA Land Surveyor’s Association

Coffey park neighbors who want to get started with rebuilding know that one major task involved is to have the property lines defined by a professional land surveyor.  The particulars involved in land survey work is very specific and detailed, and many of us had dozens of questions.  Many thanks to the Sonoma County Chapter of the California Land Surveyors’ Association for preparing a helpful resource for homeowners so we can better understand what a survey entails and why it matters. The following questions and answers are all from the information they provided to Coffey Strong. You can download their printer friendly version of this information here:  CLSA Fire Recovery FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions about Land Surveying During the Fire Recovery Process

This is intended as an informational resource for residents affected by the October wildfires.
Presented by the Sonoma County Chapter of the California Land Surveyors’ Association.

What is a professional land surveyor and why would I need one?

A Professional Land Surveyor is the only person licensed and authorized by the State of California to determine and physically locate the boundary lines of your property.

I don’t need to know exactly where my property line is. Can you just show the boundary as approximate?

Surveyors DO NOT show approximate boundary lines on maps.

What is a boundary survey?

A boundary survey is a process by which a Surveyor can determine and mark a legal description physically on the ground. This may include placing durable monuments at or near property corners or temporary wood stakes along a property line. Once completed the Land Surveyor is required to file a Record of Survey at the County recorder’s office.

On smaller sites or when development is proposed near a boundary line, the location of the boundary line must be precisely determined in order to protect the rights of you and your neighbors as well as to adhere to City or County regulations.

What is the difference between a boundary retracement and a boundary survey?

If a boundary has been previously shown on a map of record (Record of Survey, Parcel Map or Final Map), a boundary retracement may be done to locate and flag existing monuments at or near the property corners. Missing corners will not be reset.

In a boundary survey, existing corners will be found and flagged. Missing corners and/or previously unmarked corners will be set. The setting of any monuments requires filing documentation with the County. Your Surveyor will determine the appropriate documents to file based on the condition of the existing monuments found during your survey.

Lots in subdivisions are generally shown on a map of record and a boundary retracement may be performed, provided existing monuments are sufficient to retrace the filed map.

Deed described parcels that have not been previously shown on a Record of Survey will require a boundary survey to mark property lines on the ground or show them on a map.

I have an Assessor’s Parcel Map. Doesn’t that show my property line?

An Assessor’s Parcel Map (AP Map) is a useful tool but it is not a legal property map. Lines shown on AP Maps are created by the Assessor’s Office for tax purposes. They may be similar to record boundary lines but cannot be used to locate property lines.

My lot is shown on a GIS website. Can that be used to show my property lines?

Most GIS applications use digitized AP Map lines (see previous question) and are an approximation of boundary lines. GIS is an invaluable resource but cannot be used for true boundary location.

Once the survey is completed, how will I know where my property line is?

After a boundary survey is performed, your Land Surveyor will flag up existing monuments that have been found or set new durable monuments. Monuments are typically iron pipes driven in the ground with plugs stamped with their license number. Boundary surveys may require a Record of Survey map be filed with the County which will show both the found and new monuments.

If a boundary retracement is performed, existing monuments will be flagged to make them more visible. Missing corners will not be set and no Record of Survey will be filed.

What is a topographic map and why would I need one?

A topographic map, commonly referred to as a topo, shows relative elevations on a site and locates existing site features such as foundations, fences, significant trees, sidewalks, driveways, etc. A topo is used as the base mapping for architectural, civil engineering and landscape design work. Topos are used by civil engineer to design the site grading (including the building pad elevation), and to prepare an estimate of how much fill soil, if any, will need to be brought to the site to meet City or County regulations.

Are there any County fees associated with a boundary a survey?

Survey fees will vary based on many factors such as the size of the site, whether it’s been previously surveyed and whether the found lot monuments agree with those previous surveys. County fees, if required, vary depending on the type of survey being performed and may range from $17 to $694. Generally speaking, the most effective way to reduce the survey fees for parcels in a subdivision is to work together with your adjoining neighbors. There are no County fees for topographic surveys.

My architect requested the building setback lines. What are building setbacks?

Building setbacks are requirement determined by the City or County that dictate how close a new building or structure can be placed to a boundary line, waterway, well or other feature. Setback distances vary between County and City and even neighborhood. Locating a setback will most often require a boundary retracement or boundary survey.

I just need the corners of my foundation marked, how do I do that?

If your building is close to a setback to the property line you will need a boundary retracement or boundary survey to determine the location of the foundation.

What if my question isn’t answered here?

Please feel free to email additional questions to the Sonoma County Chapter of the CLSA at Secretary at [email protected] but please note, we will not be accepting requests for proposals. You may also visit us at www.sonomacountyclsa.com.

 

designing a friendly neighborhood

Designing a Friendly Neighborhood

Designing a Friendly Neighborhood

3-3-2018  I love to envision our new, friendly neighborhood with beautiful homes and new, even stronger community connections.  I asked town planner Lois Fisher for some things we can do in the design of our homes to foster that friendly atmosphere. Stay strong neighbors and keep your eyes on the future! pvh


Have you ever wondered why some neighborhoods seem to be full of people that are connected, whereas other neighborhoods feel like residents are on their own?

There is a branch of urban design called “The Social Aspects of Environmental Design” that has some answers. It turns out that

Neighborhoods with strong social ties, mutual assistance and non-profits can increase life expectancy by 5 years and reduce fatality rates by a factor of 10 during disasters”.

~ from Eric Klineberg

What are the things that you can do while selecting or designing a floor plan to increase neighborliness in Coffey Park?

One of the most important qualities of cohesive neighborhoods is that the structure of the street allows them to comfortably interact. Looking at the photos below, which street scene looks friendlier? Which one would contribute to letting the residents get to know each other?

street with garages prominent
Street with garages prominent
Street view with porches in front
Street with porches in front

Most people would say that the street in the second image, with the porches in front of the houses is the more socially connected street. That is because the active areas of the house, with people in them, are behind the porch. It is more likely that you will informally meet a neighbor if they live in a house with a porch that is close to the street, instead of a house with a hidden entrance to the side of the garage.

The Santa Rosa city zoning code allows buildings in residential districts to put the porch 15’ behind the sidewalk, 4’ closer than the garage. (Your particular zone may allow it to be even closer to the sidewalk.) Have you thought of adding a large porch to your rebuilt house? It could be your contribution to making your whole neighborhood safer and more neighborly.

If you have the good fortune of having a corner lot, you might consider a wrap around porch. That way your new house will be connected to both streets.

house with wrap around porch
Wraparound porch faces both streets

Another feature of resilient neighborhoods is that people have a chance to meet on foot because walking around the neighborhood is an enjoyable activity.  Which of the streets below look most inviting to go for a walk?Comparing streets with and without street trees in the planter strip

Comparing streets with and without street trees in the planter strip

If you previously paved over your planter strip, how about opening it up again and planting a street tree getting your neighbors to do the same?

These are ideas are some ways for you to help make Coffey Park even more safe and neighborly in its new incarnation- because of the way that you design your new house and lot.


Lois Fisher

Lois Fisher, CNU, LEED-AP and LEED-ND is the president of Fisher Town Design and an Urban Designer. Her firm specializes in creating walkable downtowns and neighborhoods as an alternative to suburban sprawl. Her approach combines an understanding of the unique assets of a site with the timeless principles of urban design. The result is healthy, socially and economically vital places that are sustainable. Her Theatre district project in downtown Petaluma is a very successful urban design redevelopment project. The successful relocation of the North Santa Rosa SMART station from Frances Drive to Guerneville Road is another example.

She is an adjunct faculty member and teaches Urban Design at Sonoma State University. Lois Fisher has served for many years on the Planning Commission for Windsor and helped to spearhead the development of the downtown there. She regularly writes ‘Close to Home’ pieces for the Press Democrat on urban design topics.

Tree News

News about Trees, Tree Removal and Chipping

News about Trees, Tree Removal and Chipping

About trees

Tree Chipping

The City of Santa Rosa will hold a free chipping event for residential property owners in the fire-impacted areas. City residents with fire-damaged green waste on their property are encouraged to bring that waste to be chipped at the following designated times and locations.

February 24 & March 10, 2018
9:00 am – 2:00 pm
Nagasawa Park
1313 Fountaingrove Parkway

February 25 & March 11, 2018
9:00 am – 2:00 pm
Coffey Park
1524 Amanda Place

Eligible green waste materials include burned and partially burned brush and felled trees up to 12” in diameter on residential property and adjacent sidewalk areas. The materials cannot be contaminated with fire debris, and residents are responsible for transporting their green waste to the chipping sites. The green waste will be chipped at no cost to residents, and the resulting wood chips will be used by the City of Santa Rosa Recreation & Parks Department for various projects throughout the City.

No permit is needed for tree removal within the wildfire burn areas of Santa Rosa city limits. However, residents should photograph the tree’s condition prior to its removal. The photographs will later need to be presented during rebuilding permit or entitlement application submittal.

For more information, visit www.sonomacountyrecovers.org/damaged-tree-removal/

Removing Burned Trees from Your Lot

The City of Santa Rosa now allows residents to remove any burned trees that pose a threat to safety and property, without getting a permit.  In order to capture the value of the old trees that are being removed and to mitigate for their possible replacement, the City is asking residents to include photos of trees to be removed with every permit package.  This is much simpler than the traditional tree-removal process that requires an arborist’s examination, a written report, a tree-removal permit, and payment of a fee.  The details of the photo-submission process are TBD.

Replacement of Burned Planter-strip Trees

In collaboration with FEMA and the In a meeting with representatives from the Santa Rosa City we heard that residents will be required to remove and replace burned trees in the planter-strip.  But we also heard (The “planter strip” is the land between the street and the sidewalk.)  This is because the residents own that land (and the trees on it!), and the residents have only given an easement on that land to the City.  Santa Rosa City is going to reconsider the types of trees that should go in the planter strip, in order to minimize future damage to underground utilities.  While the burned trees should be removed fairly soon, planting replacements should probably be held off until after houses are rebuilt.  Beautiful, tree-lined streets certainly enhance property value!

Listen to the Director of Transportation and Public Works Jason Nutt speak about sidewalks and tree removal from the recording of the February 15  Town Hall event (~ 56:00 minutes in the video)

Video Recording of Sonoma County/City of Santa Rosa Community Forum held on February 15, 2018

12 tips for a healthy building contract

12 Tips for a Healthy Building Contract

12 Tips for a Healthy Building Contract

2-15-18 by Matthew Grill, with from Lihn Pham and Jeff Okrepkie

12 Tips for a Healthy Building Contract

Contracts are an essential part of the construction industry. A contract between a property owner and a building contractor, setting forth the terms under which construction is to be carried out, the basis of remuneration, the time scale, and the penalties, if any, (for failure to comply with terms of the contract) is termed as a building/construction contract.  Before you sign this kind of a agreement, it is important to understand the terminology and scope of this agreement you are establishing.

Recommended Basic Contract: AIA A101 

The AIA (American Institute of Architects) A101 agreement is a standardized contract that is used by owners and contractors.  It is fair and balanced.  Any changes that are made to the standard document are noted or stricken so all parties can see the modifications.  Using this agreement will lessen the need for an attorney to review, or limit the attorney review time.  Most general contractors should be very familiar with this contract, and they should have no problem using it.  This will allow the owner to be in control of the contract versus the general contractor supplying it.  This is not to say the owner cannot use the general contractor’s contract.  Just remember that the contractor wrote it. 

Contract Basics 

Everything that is in the plans needs to be explicitly included or not included in the contract.  Make sure the general contractor is covering the entire plan for the home, then clearly listing out the exclusions and the allowances.  There should be nothing left up in the air.  Here is an example. 

contract language example 1
contract language example 1

Tip 1: Check for what is left off the contract

Carefully verify what is being excluded to make sure there are no gaps in what the general contractor is covering.  It is possible that you would need to budget for additional items that don’t appear on the agreement. Also, if getting multiple bids, verify that the exclusions match for all the general contractors you are considering.  The difference in exclusions could account for why one general contractor’s bid is lower than the other. 

Tip 2: Beware the potential added cost of allowances

Allowances, or owner options, are variable costs that can add up.  Pricing should be largely defined in the bid and contract.  It is fine to have a couple of small allowances that make sense.  Too many allowances is a red flag and could provide a contractor the ability to increase the contract amount well over the base contract.  If there are owner upgrades that were not identified at the time of contract signing, but options the owner elected to add to the contract work, a separate Change Order should be prepared outlining the additional work, and the document should be signed by both the owner and the builder.   

Tip 3: Architect’s responsibility 

The architect should put all of the specifications for the home on the plans.  This includes cabinet quality and style, countertop type, appliance brands/type, lighting and plumbing fixture specifications, flooring type/selections, and etc.  Specifications will allow contractors to make their bid based on accurate pricing, and will ensure that the homeowner is covered so that change orders do not occur because of missing information.   

Tip 4: Change orders add up

Change orders can be a costly addition to a project especially when a contractor comes in with a low bid.   Change orders are an area where contractors can make up a lot of ground on a low bid.  It will be tough not to have an occasion change order, but the key is to limit the exposure and put the contractor on notice that change orders will be scrutinized. 

Change Order Example
Change Order Clause Example

 

Tip 5: Insurance matters

The general contractor and all subcontractors need to name the homeowner additionally insured, and it should be spelled out in the agreement. 

Liability insurance: Minimum: $1,000,000 single claim, with $2,000,000 aggregate limits. Be sure to verify if this is a per location limit or total for the entirety of the project. Builders can group individual home rebuilds together as a single “project”. If there IS NOT a per location limit, then losses at other addresses can diminish the limits of coverage and impact you in the case of a claim.  

Workman’s compensation:  Minimum: $1,000,000

Employee automobile coverage: Minimum: $1,000,000

Additional insurance types: 

Builders Risk: (this can be provided by the owner or the contractor). Builders risk covers all property during the rebuild. This includes raw materials like stacked dry wall but also the house during construction, as it isn’t a completed building. Some homeowner’s insurance companies will cover the builders risk exposure during the rebuild. Verify who will be providing this insurance with your builder and insurance company.  

Professional Liability: Verify that all architects and engineers have professional liability or “errors & omissions” insurance. Most general liability policies do not cover professional services.  

Tip 6: Construction schedule  

There needs to be a defined construction schedule in the agreement.  The homeowner should be able to track where the home will be by certain dates and when they can expect completion.  A construction schedule cannot be prepared until building plans have been approved but the City, so make sure you clarify with the builder when you should expect a construction schedule following plan approval.  

Tip 7: Construction Delays 

There needs to be some language that protects the homeowner in the event there is a delay that is inside of the contractor’s control where they can terminate the agreement.  Especially, with the projected labor shortages and other factors.  An example could be if the project sits for 30 days with no progress or if the job is more than 60 to 90 days behind schedule, the owner has the right to cancel the agreement.  

Tip 8: Draw Schedule 

There needs to be a clear understanding in the agreement of how and when the contractors will get paid.  If there is a mortgage company holding the insurance funds, there is a timeline that needs to be defined so that the contractor’s payment draw schedule can be reconciled with release of insurance proceeds.  The last thing anyone wants is a misunderstanding of funding.  The contractor and subcontractors could pull off the job if they do not get progress payments in a timely manner.   

Tip 9: Funding details are so important  

Unlike a new construction loan, where the funding is dictated by a construction draw schedule provided by the contractor, in a fire-rebuild, the money to pay the contractor comes from the mortgage company.  Customarily, the mortgage company will issue the insurance proceeds in thirds:

  1. The initial one-third of the insurance proceeds is released upon receipt of the above-listed documents and the payment check(s).  It is not uncommon to have to wait 3-4 weeks for that first payment to arrive.
  2. The second installment payment from the mortgage company is issued at 50% completion of the construction,
  3. The final one-third draw is issued at substantial completion (95% or better) of the project.

The mortgage company will need to be notified by the owner when the project is 50% complete, and when substantial completion phases approach since they will send inspectors to verify the construction progress before they will issue payments.  Some mortgage companies may be willing to issue draws in different increments, but that is something to address once you know what your contractor’s requirements are for their payment draws.  At any rate, the communication between you and your Contractors is pivotal and it will help the entire process along, and keep cash flowing for the contractors. 

Tip 10: Insurance deprecation hold-back 

The insurance company is likely to hold back 20-25% of the initial payout. Once the project is completed they will release the depreciated funds that are held back.  Check with your adjuster to see if they can promptly release those funds and how many days/weeks until they expect you to receive supplemental payments.  If there is a mortgage company, the insurance supplemental check(s) will be made out to the homeowner and the mortgage company.  This customarily adds 3-4 weeks from the time of your receipt of the insurance payments to the time those funds are processed and issued by the mortgage companies.  Make sure to request overnight delivery of all payments from the mortgage company, and all of the  check(s) that you send to them are overnighted as well.  This could save weeks between deliveries. 

Tip 11: Documents needed for draw release 

The contractor must submit the following for progress payments.  These documents are for mortgage company disbursements and protection of the homeowner.  The mortgage company may require less documentation, but the homeowner must get the following to protect themselves. 

  • An invoice for the percentage of work completed in accordance with draw schedule outlined in the contract. 
  • A conditional lien release on progress payment from their company and all subcontractors and material suppliers.   
  • Proof that the general contractor has verified that the subtractors have paid their employees in accordance with the new state law that went into effect January 1, 2018. 

Once paid, the contractor, subcontractors and material suppliers must provide an unconditional lien release on progress payment.  Future draws will not be issued until all unconditional lien releases for prior payments are given to the owner. 

To release final payment: 

  • An invoice for final payment in accordance with the draw schedule outlined in the contract. 
  • The contractor must have all City sign-offs for the owner to occupy the home. 
  • A conditional lien release on final payment from their company and all subcontractors and material suppliers.   
  • Proof that the general contractor has verified that the subtractors have paid their employees in accordance with the new state law that went into effect January 1, 2018. 
  • Notice of completion must be filed within 10 days of final payment. 

Once paid by the owner, the contractor, subcontractors and material suppliers must provide an unconditional lien release on final payment.   

Tip 12: Dispute resolution  

In the event, there is a dispute between the owner and the contractor, it is best to have language that spells out dispute resolution.  Always consult with a lawyer for the best language and advice.  The example below allows for steps that will not end up in a court, but will be decided by binding arbitration which is much quicker and less expensive. 

Dispute resolution sample language
Dispute resolution sample language

 

 

Mortgage payments in thirds

The Mortgage Payment Process

The Mortgage Payment Process

by guest author Linh Pham, construction consultant

Mortgage Company Controls Insurance Funds

Once you have an agreed scope and cost of repairs and your insurance company has issued payment, for those Homeowners who have a Mortgage Loan on their home, the insurance payment will include the Mortgage company (or Companies if you have multiple lenders on the home), on the payment check(s). By law, Mortgage companies are required to be named on the insurance payment(s), as they have a vested interest in the property, namely the balance of your loan. They want to protect that interest by controlling the funds, and making sure that the money is applied to the Dwelling restoration so that their assets are protected.

You will have to contact your Mortgage company to request their proprietary forms as those forms will need to be completed by you and your Contractor. Ask the Mortgage company to send you their Loss Draft package (documents & forms) by e-mail so you can save time by not waiting for the package to arrive by US (Snail) mail. You will be instructed to endorse the payment check(s), and send it to the Mortgage company along with the estimate of repairs on which the settlement is based, the claim payment summary from your carrier, your signed Contract with the Contractor, and all the proprietary forms that they require you and your Contractor to complete. Only after they receive the above listed documents and the insurance payment check (s) will they begin their document review and funding process.

Funding for Your Construction Project

Unlike a new construction loan, where the funding is dictated by a construction draw schedule provided by your Contractor, in a fire-rebuild, the money to pay the Contractor comes from the Mortgage company. Customarily, the Mortgage company will issue the insurance proceeds in thirds.

The initial one-third of the insurance proceeds is released upon receipt of the above listed documents and the payment check(s). It is not uncommon to have to wait 3-4 weeks for that first payment to arrive. The second installment payment from the Mortgage company is issued at 50% completion of the construction, and the final one-third draw is issued at substantial completion (95% or better) of the project.

The Mortgage company will need to be notified by the Owner as the 50% and substantial completion phases approach, since they will send inspectors to verify the construction progress before they will issue payments.

Educate Your Contractor on the Payment Process

be diligent and forthright in discussing the funding process with your contractorMake sure that the Contractor with which you are working understands this process, and that they are willing to work directly with you and the Mortgage company so that these funds are released in a timely manner.

Before you sign on with a Contractor, do your best to address the funding issue with your Contractor and verify that he has enough capital to fund the project through the completion. Consider the volume of work being performed by the Contractor because if the Contractor is building 10-50 houses simultaneously, the Contractor may have cash flow issues as these projects near completion.

Be careful in vetting your Contractor to make sure that he actually has enough capital to undertake what he’s promising to do. Ask the Contractor if they have enough capital in reserves and backing or credit lines necessary to float the project through to completion, given the Mortgage companies’ payment practice.

Be diligent and forthright in discussing the funding process with your Contractor, as the way in which the Mortgage companies issue draws may not be familiar to your Contractor, especially if they have no experience with insurance restoration/repairs. Review with your Contractor the mortgage payment process as all parties have to enter into the construction agreement with eyes wide open.

If you are unclear in how the process works, and are uncomfortable explaining the process to your Contractor, you could refer them to a consultant (like Scope Writing Services) as they can also be used to help educate your Contractor on the Mortgage process. You don’t have to go through this process alone.

Do everything in writing with the Contractor and the insurance company and avoid leaving and costs “Pending”

The Insurance Settlement Process

The Insurance Settlement Process

article by guest author Linh Pham, Construction Consultant 

Many initial claim settlement payments issued by carriers have been based upon the appraised value of your property. The market value (appraisal) of the original house has nothing to do with the rebuilding cost whatsoever. Some insurance companies have elected to use the market value of the property to establish the “actual cash value” (ACV) payment, but this is only an INITIAL payment, and NOT the final settlement number by any means. This is not the insurance company’s attempt to “low ball” your settlement. It is just a way for them to be compliant with the Department of Insurance regulations to get an “undisputed damage” payment issued so that the homeowners have funds to begin the repairs process. This payment does not represent a final settlement, so don’t be discouraged or frustrated to the point of abandoning the reconstruction of your home, even if your coverage limits appear to be insufficient to replace your home. Accepting that initial pay-out does not mean that you are not entitled to other payments or that your claim ends with this payment. Accept the payment, learn the insurance settlement process, and know your options, as things are not as bleak as they may appear sometimes. Knowledge is power, and we hope the following information will empower you by giving you a clear understanding of the insurance settlement and the rebuilding process.

Initial Claims Process

Under normal circumstances, an Adjuster or your Contractor creates a repair estimate containing an itemized, detailed scope of work that describes the repairs to your home in significant detail. This scope includes everything from repairs to the foundation, framing, electrical, plumbing, insulation, drywall, cabinets, countertops, and paint. Even minute details like window coverings, doorknobs, bathroom hardware, door stops, cabinet knobs & drawer pulls, and window coverings are included. It is important that the scope of repairs includes everything that has been done to the home in terms of updating and remodeling (including structural additions) and landscaping details, as it is the responsibility of the insurance company to repair/replace your home to “pre-loss condition”. (Of course, the scope of repairs does NOT include any personal property or content items such as refrigerators, washer/dryers, or furnishings).

The scope of repairs is MUCH more detailed than an appraisal. It is an itemized repair estimate that the insurance company needs to prepare themselves, or to review an estimate that the Homeowner/Contractors submits in order to issue a more accurate ACV payment. For those of you who have been issued an initial ACV payment based upon a property appraisal, this is one an example of how the normal claims process has deviated due to this unprecedented and extraordinary event. Now, it is up to Homeowners/Contractors to provide realistic restoration estimates in order to secure additional funding for your construction.

Estimate Preparation

Ideally, you would have hired a Contractor/Builder and had them prepare the repair scope/estimate for submission to the insurance company. This is assuming that the contractor is capable of creating a detailed, itemized estimate to restore your home to “pre-loss condition”. This estimate should include site preparation, soils testing costs, surveying, engineering, architectural, permit costs, required building code upgrades, underground utilities connection, fencing/landscaping, and , of course, the dwelling repairs, including all soft costs.

In the insurance restoration industry, an estimatics program called Xactimate is the standard software that is utilized. The pricing contained within Xactimate is updated on a monthly basis, so the insurance carriers will not challenge the pricing contained within the software, but they will review the scope of the repairs outlined in the estimate provided by your Contractor in order to reach an agreed scope and cost of repairs with your contractor. Again, this is what usually happens under normal circumstances.

Nothing about this fire storm is normal as all of the resources that are normally available are over-extended. The number of restoration contractors in the local area cannot handle the volume of work, so finding a contractor that can provide an Xactimate estimate can be challenging to say the least. If you cannot find a contractor that can provide Xactimate estimates, you can retain the services of a Public Adjuster, an Attorney (who has access to such resources), or an insurance restoration consultant like Scope Writing Services.

The Settlement Process

The itemized repair estimate that is submitted to your insurance company will be higher than the appraised value of your ACV settlement because it is an actual bid/cost estimate for the restoration of your home. The insurance company will need time to review and process this new information.

Insurance companies are not required to accept the repair estimate in its entirety; they are just required to give it consideration and compare it to their estimated cost of repairs (in the event that they have developed their own separate scope/estimate of repairs). If they do not have an estimate prepared, they may consult with another restoration contractor/builder for a competitive bid, or have an estimate prepared for them by one of their Adjusters or construction consultants for comparison purposes.

Typically, the estimate that they obtain will be written on Xactimate software so that they have a detailed, itemized scope to compare to.   If their Adjuster/Contractor/ Consultant comes back with a different scope or a lower cost for the same scope, it’s time for negotiation. It is the insurance company’s job is to investigate the bid/estimate in a good-faith effort to move forward with the damage evaluation process as the goal is to reach an agreed cost of repairs on which the claim settlement can be based.

Once a scope and cost of repairs has been agreed to with your carrier, this will set your initial construction budget and this will enable you to make some decisions about rebuilding your home. Without an agreed cost settlement from your insurance company, how can you even begin to know what your construction budget is? That is why getting an agreed cost between you/ your Contractor and your insurance company is the first step in the restoration process.

After an agreed cost is reached, the insurance company will apply a percentage depreciation to the replacement cost estimate based upon the age and condition of your home. The depreciation amount is subtracted from the replacement estimate total, which results in an Actual Cash Value settlement. Depreciation is paid out at the completion of the repairs/restoration work, and upon your carrier’s receipt of the Contractor’s final invoice documenting the incurred repair costs.

Settlement & Contract Price Are Not One and the Same

Once an agreed scope and cost of repairs is achieved with the insurance company, they will review your coverage limits and the settlement payout will be subject to those limits. Just because you have an initial agreed upon scope and cost of repairs does not mean that you will have enough funds to repair/rebuild your home to pre-loss condition.

In the event that your policy limits are below your estimated restoration cost, getting a firm settlement number from your carrier will allow you to make the tough decisions that are needed to proceed with the rebuilding. This is where your Contractor/Builder plays an integral role: he must be able to tell you if the insurance proceeds are sufficient to rebuild the home to pre-loss condition, and if not, how much more costs above the available insurance proceeds are needed for the rebuild. Once you know what your carrier will pay on your claim, you will be able to budget for the repairs and decide whether or not to pursue a loan to bridge the gap between the insurance settlement and the actual cost of the rebuild.

Owner Selections/Changes/Upgrades Dictate Contract Price

As the carrier is reviewing the cost estimate for the “pre-loss” or original construction, the homeowner needs to communicate to the Contractor what kind of home and interior finishes they want to re-build and ask the Contractor/Builder to provide them with a detailed estimate or bid for that build-back. If there is a cost increase for upgrading the size of the home or the interior finishes and amenities, have the Contractor/Builder price out the upgrades so that you will be clear on the increased cost of your customized re-build. In other words, if you want a better, upgraded home, you need to let the Contractor know what it is that you want him to build, and then he can price-out the cost above what the original or “pre-loss” construction will be.

If the contractor wants to charge you for creating this bid, he’s the wrong contractor. This is a normal “sales acquisition cost” or a cost of sale for the contractor to present you with build-back options. However, respect your Contractor’s time and be thorough in providing him with as much detail on your materials selections or structure changes as you can so he can give you an accurate bid the first time. Know that if you are making structural changes, that will have to start at the architectural/ engineering level, and the Contractor will not be able to give you a price until he can review the completed engineered plans that depict the desired changes. The more you change your mind and add to your “wish list”, the longer it will take for the contractor to provide you with a firm cost. The Owners should also not allow any construction work to begin before signing a Contract containing a set price with the Contractor.

Insurance Supplement Process

But what if the initial settlement does not cover additional construction costs discovered after the initial agreed scope and cost of repairs such as Building Code upgrades that are required by the local or state municipalities? Code upgrades may include fire sprinkler systems, fire resistant materials such as tile or composition shingle roofing, and fire and safety requirements such as tamper resistant plugs/outlets, inter-connected smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors on every level of the home.

The contractor must be able to document and explain Code upgrades to the insurance company, and make sure that he has the insurance company’s approval before beginning the reconstruction. The Contractor must also demonstrate knowledge of insurance coverage limits in order to anticipate the amount of resources available from the insurance settlement, and advise the Homeowners accordingly when the insurance coverage is short of the costs needed to repair the home to pre-loss condition.

The Contractor should also be able to address increase cost of construction as well as unexpected costs that inevitably arise on a substantial construction project. This requires the Contractor to be pro-active in communicating with the Owner and the insurance carrier any increase in cost or scope of work as soon as they are identified. If the additional cost is warranted and the insurance carrier accepts the increased costs (barring any coverage limits issues), the carrier will issue additional payments. This additional damage claim is commonly referred to as “supplement”, and “supplements” are a normal and expected part of the insurance claim process. The key fact is that these additional costs should be presented to the insurance company for review and approval prior to performance of the work.

The contractor should NOT initiate the restoration/replacement of your home until he received the initial agreed scope and cost of repairs with the insurance company, and has approval of supplemental costs that are discovered.

Expected Surge in Pricing Due to Demand

getting an agreed costWhen the initial draw has been received by your Contractor and construction activity begins, the restoration will typically take at least 6-12 months to complete. During that time, labor rates and material costs are definitely going to increase due to the unusually high demand caused by the need to rebuild 5,130 houses in Sonoma County. Knowledgeable people estimate that these increases could be in the range of 10-30%. As stated above, the contractor must inform the insurance company of these increases as they happen, and the insurance company will need to consider additional pay-outs warranted by the pricing increases. If these costs can be documented in a manner that they are accepted by the insurance companies, they will issue additional payments.

It may be difficult for many people to accept, but an insurance claim is often open-ended, as payments are not final until construction is completed and the Contractor submits his final invoice to the insurance company requesting the final pay-out. The bulk of the funds for the final pay-out is for the depreciation that was withheld or deducted from the initial settlement (as described above). Of course, this is assuming that coverage limits are not an issue and that your policy has enough coverage to pay for the restoration.

Know Your Rights

The insurance company owes to repair/rebuild your home to “pre-loss condition”.  You are in control of your claim and the insurance company cannot pressure you into starting the repairs to your home in order to save themselves on the cost of your temporary living arrangements or Additional Living Expense (ALE).

Refuse to break ground on the construction of your home until you have an agreed cost of repairs, including Building Code required upgrades, site preparation, landscaping or other structures repairs, etc. Once you have an agreed scope and cost of repairs, ask the carrier to pay the Extended Replacement Cost and the Code upgrades up front (if you have this coverage on your policy).

Do not let the insurance company pressure you into accepting a “policy limits” settlement unless you thoroughly understand your coverages and policy limits.

Do not let a Contractor pressure you into signing a Contract unless you know what your cost will be for the re-build, including the cost of your desired upgrades with those costs outlined on written bid or estimate.

Do everything in writing with the Contractor and the insurance company and avoid leaving and costs “Pending” or allow those details to be “worked out” at a later time.

If the insurance carrier is delaying your settlement or is unresponsive to your attempts to contact them, threaten to file a complaint with the Insurance Commissioner’s Office, and whenever possible, do it in writing or by e-mail.

Power update regarding PG&E

Power: Update Regarding PG&E Service for Coffey Park

Power: Update Regarding PG&E Service for Coffey Park

written by Steve Rahmn – Block Captain / Area 4

As the rebuild efforts begin to take shape, many people have asked about how Pacific Gas and Electric is planning to address many issues impacting the rebuild efforts in Coffey Park. The following information was provided by their community involvement team in a presentation recently to Coffey Strong block captains.

PG&E Billing

Have you not received a bill yet? Currently PG&E is holding back bills while their accounting department continues to review accounts. This process takes time as it includes validation of lost homes and third party billing partners, such as Sonoma Clean Power. This includes your Coffey Park final billing and where you now reside. As soon as this review is complete, PG&E will be issuing bills.  Please review your bill when you finally receive one.

If your bill has a balance exceeding $500.00, you will receive a proactive call from PG&E to discuss your bill in its whole. You may also contact them to arrange for a payment schedule that works for you. Regardless of the size of your bill you receive, PG&E will not take any credit action against fire victims, and will work with any customer on a payment plan.

pg&e fire response
Click blue text box to visit PG&E fire response webpage

Temporary Power for Construction

Currently PG&E has installed temporary power poles throughout Coffey Park. These have been strategically placed as to not impact new underground construction that will be required. These poles will also serve to provide temporary power for your contractor, support temporary street lighting and if you are fortunate to have your home rebuilt prior to permanent power, they will allow temporary connection to your home. They can also serve as a way to provide temporary phone and television service as well.

When a contractor needs temporary power to the site, they need to fill out an application, applying as a ‘new business for temporary power’ at https://www.pge.com/cco/. Since temporary power activation may take up to one month, apply for this service as soon as possible (if you check the box to note that it is fire related, they will expedite the service.) This applies to people who are interested in an RV connection as well. PG&E has agreed to waive the connection fees for this, however you or your contractor will be required to pay for the power used. The contractor will be required to provide a temporary power pole built to PG&E standards. At that time PG&E will place a meter.

Neighbors have requested installation of more street lights, since some streets in Coffey Park are too dark at night. This is being addressed and we report back once additional information is provided.

New Infrastructure for Utilities

Currently PG&E is working on the new underground utilities design. This is an extensive project that will be broken up into 5 phases.  These phases 1-5 do not align with the Coffey Strong area map, but are all based on the efficient distribution of power to our neighborhood. Most utilities such as gas, electric, telephone, and cable are located under the sidewalks. This work will require sidewalks to be removed and replaced in certain areas. At this time it is unclear if the sidewalk replacement will fall on the responsibility of the City of Santa Rosa or PG&E.

Once the PG&E design is complete, they send their drawings to telephone and cable designers who will then add their scope. This usually takes 45 days, however, this will be expedited. There have been talks about including Sonic to the area, a matter still under negotiations.

Hook-Ups

Contractors will be responsible to provide conduits for PG&E, phone and television cables from the meter at the house to the street and sized by utility standards. These conduits are required to extend to the approximate area of where they were prior to the fire. PG&E will assist in defining this location. PG&E will extend these conduit to the service point and connect complete. There will be no cost for this.

200 Amps

PG&E has assumed all service to be 200 amps. If your home requires an increased service size or you are requesting multi-metering for an additional meter for a granny unit, that cost and arrangement for that service will be the responsibility of the customer.

Although the new PG&E standard requires all above-ground transformers, they have been provided a variance to continue to have in-ground transformers.

PG&E plans to begin construction late April/early May. Duration of construction is unknown at this time but we will provide this information as it becomes available.